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Einrichtungen >> Fakultät Geistes- und Kulturwissenschaften >>

Lehrveranstaltungen

 

Just write!

Dozent/in:
Touhid Chowdhury
Angaben:
Nachbesprechung
Termine:
Einzeltermin am 10.2.2020, Einzeltermin am 11.3.2020, 18:30 - 20:00, U9/01.11

 

Key Texts in Literary Theory

Dozent/in:
Touhid Chowdhury
Angaben:
Übung, 1 SWS, ECTS: 1, Studium Generale, Englischsprachig
Termine:
jede 2. Woche Mi, 20:00 - 22:00, U9/01.11
Voraussetzungen / Organisatorisches:
1. Module Allocation:

  • BA Anglistik/Amerikanistik (ab Studienbeginn zum WS 14/15): Ergänzungsmodul Methoden und Theorien der Englischen und Amerikanischen Literaturwissenschaft (alle Haupt- und Nebenfächer) (1 ECTS)

  • BA Anglistik/Amerikanistik (ab Studienbeginn zum SoSe 2009): Ergänzungsmodul Methoden und Theorien (1 ECTS, ab Studienbeginn zum SoSe 2012 unbenotet)

  • alle alten Studiengänge: Übung (1 ECTS)


2. (De)Registration:

in FlexNow! (except for guest auditors): 01.09.2019, 10:00 - 01.12.2019, 23:59

guest auditors: please contact lecturer
Inhalt:
In this seminar we will study trends and schools in literary theory since the 1950s. We may discuss key texts by thinkers identified with formalism and structuralism, deconstruction and poststructuralism, gender studies and queer theory, psychoanalytical criticism, (Neo)Marxism and Cultural Materialism, New Historicism, postcolonial criticism and reader-response theory.
Depending on the participants personal interests, we may also consider more recent approaches like ecocriticism and possible-worlds theory or less "canonized" theories (e.g. systems theory).

The course is intended to assist students in both finding own approaches towards primary texts and in identifying mind-sets and methods applied in the secondary sources they read in their other seminars: "What theory demonstrates [...] is that there is no position free of theory, not even the one called common sense" (V. B. Leitch).
Empfohlene Literatur:
A course reader will be made available for download at our VC group once the schedule has been agreed upon.

 

“My name is Khan and I am not a Terrorist”: Muslim Characters in Post 9/11 Bollywood Narratives

Dozent/in:
Touhid Chowdhury
Angaben:
Übung, 2 SWS, ECTS: 4, Studium Generale, Englischsprachig
Termine:
Mo, 14:00 - 16:00, U9/01.11
Voraussetzungen / Organisatorisches:
1. Module Allocation:

all modules including an obligatory/optional reading tutorial (Übung) for literature and culture (except Consolidation Module!) in
LA GS/HS/MS/RS/GY
BA Anglistik/Amerikanistik
MA English and American Studies
MA WiPäd
Erweiterungsbereich English and American Studies

2. (De)Registration:

in FlexNow! (except for guest auditors): 01.09.2019, 10:00 - 01.12.2019, 23:59

guest auditors: please contact lecturer
Inhalt:
Bollywood is one of the biggest movie industries in the world that produces approximately 1600 movies in a year. In terms of viewership and cultural impact, Bollywood competes with Hollywood as the most influential cinema on the globe. Furthermore, the substantial Indian diasporas around the world encourage Bollywood producers to make cinemas based on current world phenomena; and since the 9/11, a lot of Bollywood movies were made that talk about terrorism and terrorists.

This Übung is intended to explore the theme of “terrorism” in post 9/11 Bollywood movies and literary representation of Muslim characters in it. To do so, this class will focus on films that explicitly refer to 9/11 and the 2008’s Mumbai terrorist attack.
Empfohlene Literatur:
The following book will be discussed in class:
Mohsin Hamid. The Reluctant Fundamentalist. 2007

The following movies will be discussed in the class:

1. My Name is Khan. Dir. Karan Johar.
2. Kurbaan. Dir. Rensil D’Silva.
3. New York. Dir. Kabir Khan.
4. Shoot at Sight. Dir. Jag Mundhra.
5. The Reluctant Fundamentalist. Dir. Mira Nair.
6. Hotel Mumbai. Dir. Anthony Moras.

Students should watch these movies before the semester begins. All additional readings for the class will be provided in the VC.

 

“Who Am I?”: Individual and Collective Identities

Dozent/in:
Touhid Chowdhury
Angaben:
Seminar, 2 SWS, ECTS: 6, Studium Generale, Englischsprachig, Erweiterungsbereich
Termine:
Di, 8:00 - 10:00, LU19/00.13
Voraussetzungen / Organisatorisches:
1. Module Allocation:

BA Anglistik/Amerikanistik: Aufbaumodul Literaturwissenschaft / Aufbaumodul Kulturwissenschaft / freie Erweiterung: Seminar 6 ECTS
Ergänzungsmodul Literaturwissenschaft: Seminar max. 6 ECTS
BA Berufliche Bildung: Basis/Aufbaumodul Literaturwissenschaft: Seminar 6 ECTS
LA GS/HS/MS/RS: Basis/Aufbaumodul Literaturwissenschaft (b): Seminar 6 ECTS
LA GY: Aufbaumodul Literaturwissenschaft / Aufbaumodul Kulturwissenschaft: Seminar 6 ECTS

2. (De)Registration:

in FlexNow! (except for guest auditors): 01.09.2019, 10:00 - 01.12.2019, 23:59

guest auditors: please contact lecturer
Inhalt:
Whichever way we conceive “identity,” individual or collective, it always has many precedents ranging from cultural backgrounds to the types of television shows one grows up with. The core idea of “identity” evolves around the timeless question: “who am I?” and the other relevant questions: "who and what do I appear: to myself and others." As a result, a person can be many things at once, even when these different “identities” appear inconsistent or even contradictory. Someone could be, for example, a political conservative, religiously atheist or conversely liberal. All these descriptions act as categories that describe us in a different context. Such markers or identifiers are vital to our life experiences, both within our known circles or surroundings and outside of them. In short, these markers or identifiers help us navigate or negotiate our way through the social landscape.
Through the lenses of literary and cultural studies, this seminar aims to analyze texts related to identity and identity formation. In-class discussion will be based on:
1. How do society and culture shape and challenge individual or collective identities?
2. How do we form our own personal identification markers/identity?
3. How do communities and individuals form identities?
4. How do power and hegemony operate within and through culture?
5. What causes individual and collective identities to change over time?
6. How do individuals and groups express their identities?
7. How are people and groups with particular identities viewed and treated by others?

The course will be built on engagement with academic readings of various definitions and theories of identity and identity formations from different academic disciplines. The objective of this course is to offer an understanding of various literary texts dealing with individual and collective identities. Students are expected to learn how to apply their understanding of literary and cultural theories to an interpretation of literary texts.
Empfohlene Literatur:
Readings

Anthony Elliot. Ed. Routledge Handbook of Identity Studies

Literary Texts:

Mira Jacob. Good Talk: A Memoir in Conversation
Zadie Smith. White Teeth
David Mitchell. Cloud Atlas
Chris Cleve. Little Bee



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